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Kanban

The Kanban method

(ripoff from wikipedia & other sources)
src: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kanban_(development)
src: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kanban_board

translates roughly as “signal card”

K. is a method for managing knowledge work with an emphasis on just-in-time delivery while not overloading the team members. In this approach, the process, from definition of a task to its delivery to the customer, is displayed for participants to see and developers pull work from a queue.

The Kanban method is rooted in four basic principles:

  • Start with what you do now
  • Agree to pursue incremental, evolutionary change
  • Respect the current process, roles, responsibilities & titles
  • Leadership at all levels

Six core practices

Anderson identified five core properties that had been observed in each successful implementation of the Kanban method.[2] They were later relabeled as practices and extended with the addition of a sixth.

1. Visualise

The workflow of knowledge work is inherently invisible. Visualising the flow of work and making it visible is core to understanding how work proceeds. Without understanding the workflow, making the right changes is harder.
A common way to visualise the workflow is to use a card wall with cards and columns. The columns on the card wall representing the different states or steps in the workflow.

2. Limit WIP
Limiting work-in-process implies that a pull system is implemented on parts or all of the workflow. The pull system will act as one of the main stimuli for continuous, incremental and evolutionary changes to your system.
The pull system can be implemented as a kanban system, a CONWIP system, a DBR system, or some other variant. The critical elements are that work-in-process at each state in the workflow is limited and that new work is “pulled” into the new information discovery activity when there is available capacity within the local WIP limit.

3. Manage flow
The flow of work through each state in the workflow should be monitored, measured and reported. By actively managing the flow the continuous, incremental and evolutionary changes to the system can be evaluated to have positive or negative effects on the system.

4. Make policies explicit
Until the mechanism of a process is made explicit it is often hard or impossible to hold a discussion about improving it. Without an explicit understanding of how things work and how work is actually done, any discussion of problems tends to be emotional, anecdotal and subjective. With an explicit understanding it is possible to move to a more rational, empirical, objective discussion of issues. This is more likely to facilitate consensus around improvement suggestions.

5. Implement feedback loops
Collaboration to review flow of work and demand versus capability measures, metrics and indicators coupled with anecdotal narrative explaining notable events is vital to enabling evolutionary change. Organizations that have not implemented the second level of feedback – the operations review – have generally not seen process improvements beyond a localized team level. As a result, they have not realized the full benefits of Kanban observed elsewhere.

6. Improve collaboratively, evolve experimentally (using models and the scientific method)
The Kanban method encourages small continuous, incremental and evolutionary changes that stick. When teams have a shared understanding of theories about work, workflow, process, and risk, they are more likely to be able to build a shared comprehension of a problem and suggest improvement actions which can be agreed by consensus.
The Kanban method suggests that a scientific approach is used to implement continuous, incremental and evolutionary changes. The method does not prescribe a specific scientific method to use.

src: http://www.kanbanblog.com/explained/

Kanban is a new technique for managing a software development process in a highly efficient way. Kanban underpins Toyota’s “just-in-time” (JIT) production system. Although producing software is a creative activity and therefore different to mass-producing cars, the underlying mechanism for managing the production line can still be applied.

A software development process can be thought of as a pipeline with feature requests entering one end and improved software emerging from the other end.

Inside the pipeline, there will be some kind of process which could range from an informal ad hoc process to a highly formal phased process. In this article, we’ll assume a simple phased process of: (1) analyse the requirements, (2) develop the code, and (3) test it works.

src: http://www.kanbanblog.com/explained/GettingStarted.html

How to get started with Kanban…

1. Map your value stream (your development process).
Where do feature ideas come from? What are all the steps that the idea goes through until it’s sitting in the hands of the end-user?
2. Define the start and end points for the Kanban system.
These should preferably be where you have political control. Don’t worry too much about starting with a narrow focus, as people outside the span will soon ask to join in.
3. Agree:
Initial WIP limits and policies for changing or temporarily breaking them
Process for prioritising and selecting features
Policies for different classes of service (e.g. “standard”, “expedite”, “fixed delivery date”). Are estimates needed? When choosing work, which will be selected first?
Frequency of reviews
4. Draw up a Kanban board.
All you need is a whiteboard and some Post-It™ notes. Don’t spend too much time making it look beautiful because it will almost certainly evolve.
5. Start using it.
6. Empirically adjust.

performance tuning

On Code Optimization from the Web Archive

On Premature Optimization

On Premature Optimization 😉

Write Dumb Code (found in the webarchive.org)