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[programming & visualization]

Category Archives: Uncategorized

Interactive Page with Data Science Skills in Demand

d-scientist-jd

Building a Production Machine Learning Infrastructure

The following is a presentation by Josh Willis. Josh provides a rare, no-nonsense view on the field of data science.

The “Data Science Workflow” Screenshot

data-science-workflow-josh-willis

Introducing my new blog: GTDiR

Getting Things Done in R (gtdir.wordpress.com) is my new blog which will be dedicated to what I personally develop in R and where I will share my thoughts on programming in the R environment.

UML: Tools for Online Collaboration

PlantUML: http://plantuml.com/ (free and the best)

WebSequenceDiagrams: https://www.websequencediagrams.com/ (free)

Creately: http://creately.com/diagram-community/popular/t/sequence-diagram (allows limited free use)

UMLet: http://www.umlet.com/umletino/umletino.html (free)

Gksinner: http://www.gskinner.com/gmodeler/app/run.html (free) (mostly for FlashMX’s Actionscript, and Javascript)

http://www.draw.io: https://www.draw.io/ (free)

GenMyModel: https://www.genmymodel.com/ (free but limited)

 

Debugging in R

This is a collection of links related to debugging in R (to be updated)

Contents:
* Core debugging tools in R
* Core language tools in R
* Articles about debugging in R

The Truth About Automation

automation

Reposted from the web-book / website of Randall Munroe (http://xkcd.com/1319/) under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.

Dynamic network visualization in R

One way to create editable networks is to use RCytoscape [link1, link2]. Another way is to use tkplot() from within “igraph” package. tkplot produces editable networks which you can adjust manually and save via tkplot.getcoords(). The latter method is described in the tutorial whose screenshot you can see below. Click on the screenshot to jump to the tutorial.

netw-vis_beginning.gif

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Smaller font sizes for Eclipse on Linux

Daniel Ferbers Technical Tavern

This article describes some approaches to launch Eclipse on Linux with smaller font sizes and customized graphical user interface (GUI).

The modern desktop environments like KDE or Gnome use larger font sizes to enhance readability of screen contents. However, Eclipse, looks better with a clean design and small fonts.

Views like Package Explorer or Outline may contain very large listings of important information. Eclipse uses are not willing to waste precious space neither with large fonts nor with fancy window decorations.

View original post 589 more words

Selected Trading Forums, Blogs, and Other Resources

C++ and Beyond 2011: Herb Sutter – Why C++?

C and C++ Renaissance: Performance per watt/dollar/cycle matters.